Man ridiculed for tattoo of food dish name in Chinese

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<p>The photo shows a man proudly displaying his “pork fried rice” tattoo to the amusement of social media users. (Photo courtesy of @moreganplease/Reddit)</p>

The photo shows a man proudly displaying his “pork fried rice” tattoo to the amusement of social media users. (Photo courtesy of @moreganplease/Reddit)

TAIPEI (The China Post) — Tattoos are commonly known as a pretty permanent ink printing one gets on their bodies, so one wrong move could see the person being subject to ridicule for the rest of their lives — or until its painful removal.

One man recently learned this the hard way as his picture quickly made the rounds on the Internet in an “ink shaming forum” for bearing a tattoo on his left leg which read, “pork fried rice” (豬肉炒飯) in Chinese.

The picture was posted by another confused foreigner who couldn’t read Chinese and was wondering what the words meant for it to be subject to online shaming.

Foreigners and Taiwanese alike swiftly gathered in the comment section to question the man’s choice of tattoo and share their own experience of witnessing horrifying Chinese-character tattoos.

Many were curious as to the reasoning behind getting the tattoo, with one social media user asking whether or not it would make more sense to get the tattoo on the man’s forearm, so he can order his “favorite dish” at Chinese restaurants.

The discussion also included others asking if he was from Taiwan as the words were written in Traditional Chinese.

This subsequently led to indignant Taiwanese joining in the discussion stating that a true local would never do that.

A member of the foreign community also shared a story of once seeing a girl with “curry” (咖哩) tattooed in Chinese; however, because the tattoo artist was not familiar with Chinese characters, they stretched out the characters to read “mouth, power, mouth, mouth, village.” (口力口口里)

Many also criticized the printed font the tattoo artist used, claiming it to be boring and lifeless whilst equating it to tattooing English words using “Times New Roman” font.

On the other hand, the tattoo may have inadvertently inspired others, as some commented they would consider getting “Kung Pao Chicken” (宮保雞丁) or “tomato and eggs” (番茄炒蛋) on their bodies.